Featured

Welcome to the Brooklin Poetry Society

Welcome!

Welcome to the official website of the Brooklin Poetry Society! We are a small poetry collective located in Brooklin, Ontario, dedicated to furthering the spaces for poets and poetry on the shores of Lake Ontario and surrounding areas. Our site is currently a work in progress, but we hope you’ll enjoy the poetry you find here. Please feel free to find us on Facebook (@Brooklin Poetry Society), Instagram (@brooklinpoetrysociety) and Twitter (@BrooklinPoetSoc).

Please be aware that the contents of all web pages on this website are protected by copyright law and may not be used in whole, or in part, without the express consent of the authors.

The Brooklin Poetry Society gratefully acknowledges the generous financial support of the Town of Whitby’s Performing Arts Community Development Fund. https://www.whitby.ca/en/

Thanks for visiting!

post

So We’ll Go No More A Roving

Post written by FJ Doucet, BPS President

Friends, Romans, Countrymen (in the words of Shakespeare’s Marc Antony), lend me your ears:

For its fortunate members, Brooklin Poetry Society has been a guiding presence in our writing lives. Most certainly, the society has helped me personally in discovering the ins and outs of the writing process–not only craft, but how to submit to a magazine, what is common practise “in the field,” and how to network, critique, and make friends of fellow writers.

Yet how many things have changed for us all, these past two years. The world has moved on from the one we knew and, so too, has the world moved our poets onwards to new opportunities, new projects, new ambitions. Only before we turn the page, we extend our greatest thanks to everyone who ever supported us in BPS: all of our fellow writers and creatives, as well as the City of Whitby grants that allowed us to maintain a professional WordPress subscription.

Let it not be said that we left the society or that it left us, rather that it passed, as all things must pass.

And every passing is a kind of death. So the poets write of this, too.

So We’ll Go No More a Roving

by Lord Byron

Though the night was made for loving,

   And the day returns too soon,

Yet we’ll go no more a roving

   By the light of the moon.

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

Season’s Greetings!

Every part of this month’s blog was composed by BPS member Connie Pompilii, including her beautiful artwork!

Just when the beauty of Autumn ends, the wonder of Winter begins. As the weather gets colder and the days get shorter, the month of December brings with it a sense of peace and joy.

A December’s Walk

The winter winds blow

as glittery flakes dance

across the pale blue sky.

Icicles glisten from snowy rooftops

as frosted windows glow.

Crimson red berries peek from

beneath snow laden branches

as woodland creatures gather underneath.

Pinecones drip off trees

as I breath in the evergreen air.

Some Poets Born in December:

Rainer Maria Rilke

John Milton

Emily Dickenson

Harriet Monroe

Thomas Gray

Happy Poetry!

September is for poetry

As the leaves begin to turn yellow orange and red, our thoughts begin to turn to poetry again!

With that in mind, we offer our congratulations to the winners and honourable mentions of the 4th annual Brooklin Poetry Society writing contest.

On the theme of renaissance, interpretations were scintillating and diverse!

The complete text of all the finalists’ works are now available for your reading pleasure:

4th Annual Poetry Contest Shortlist

Just mid-way through the summer and we already have a shortlist for our fourth annual poetry contest, with poets chosen by our very talented judge and previous year’s winner, Anna Yin.

Thank you to everyone who submitted and congratulations to everyone on the list! Winners will be announced at the end of this month.

In alphabetical order, our shortlist:

Moni Brar

Debbie Okun Hill

Sara MacDonald

Nilofar Shidmehr

Pamela Yuen

On a June’s Day

The last blog before our summer break was written by BPS member Connie Pompilii. Connie is also an artist, and the creator of the lovely, summery pictures accompanying the blog.

The arrival of June brings with it a gentle reminder to enjoy the simple things. Whether it’s having a cup of coffee on the front porch, reading a book under a shaded tree, or walking in the park, June, like poetry, is full of many treasures just waiting to be discovered.

On a June’s Day

In fields of green

dandelion wishes appear

as

morning glories rise

to greet the sun.

Rows of lavender and marigolds

grace the garden

as sweet cherry tomatoes…

Tra La It’s May

This month’s blog writer, Gail M. Murray, explores the month of May as it appears in both history and verse.

 May reminds me of Scarborough Music Theatre’s production of Lerner and Lowe’s Camelot. I’m securing silk daisies in my hair before bursting on stage to perform our dazzling production number “The Lusty Month of May”. As members of Lady Guinevere’s court, we frolic among the flowers, as we go a-maying. Guinevere, more sensuous earth goddess than regal queen, meets celibate Lancelot at the end of this romp.

Tra la, it’s May, the lusty month of May                                             

          That darling month when everyone throws self-control away

          It’s May, it’s May that gorgeous holiday

          When all the world is brimming with fun, wholesome or un-

Earliest known May celebrants…

National Poetry Month

Join Brooklin Poetry Society in celebration of National Poetry Month by attending our fourth annual poetry workshop. Hosted by Whitby Public Library, this year’s event will take place online due to the pandemic.

Interested individuals should sign up through the library’s system. We look forward to writing with you!

For sign-up details, click here.

An Acorn in the Desert

Just as we move into another Whitby spring, we get one last gust of winter, with snowfall this April first. Appropriately, Patrick Meade‘s blog for this month is the deceptively simple and wonderfully charming tale of a little Snowflake falling from Earth to sky and living a thousand lives all the way down.

Hey, Little Snowflake, what are you up to?

Hi, Grand Snowflake. Not much. Like you, I’m just falling.

I know you’re falling, but what else are you doing?

Oh, nothing. Just waiting, I guess.

For what?

Until I reach Earth.

Would you like to play a game while we’re falling?

Sure, which one?

How about a game of What If?

Oh, I like that. But do we have time?

Sure, we have plenty of time, Little One, before that happens.

Who goes first?

YOU, LITTLE SNOWFLAKE…

We offer refuge

The blog for March is written by veteran BPS member Jenny Sorensen

I remember some years ago listening to an interview with an acclaimed literary critic on CBC radio and he pointed out something both simple and true:  books – and literature – provide companionship.

The Brooklin Poetry Society, by its very nature, offers companionship.

Through words.

Through ideas.

With the evocation of feeling in poetry, the walls are down.

We can create a tapestry of meaning out of who we are anytime, anywhere.

This has always been the shaman in the human.

This ability to transcend, to reinvent, to overcome and recreate– we are bird, fish. We are river, rock, history and future.

The Buddhists speak of sangha, a community of the devout, where we take refuge. In this sacred place, we take refuge. I like that–this sense of sheltering in something.

Everywhere, life seeks its soil, its air, its water, and we, we lift ourselves, long needles seeking meaning. How we thread it through our lives–the patterns, the threads we choose, the gaps and material we bring together. The cable and satellite we string with face and voice and thought. We weave a blanket with our reaching.  Far and wide. Near and present.

when the moment is quiet and still in the mush of night and the slide of day when you look inside the fabric you have made this is the blanket here is warmth here is sacred here is companionship here is shelter

March is upon us, that time of year when we feel and see that even that which has been closed, that which has been dormant, hidden, has seeds and life and potential, waiting to sing. It surrounds us

each and every single bud on the great tree

the individual in the sacred

woven together with presence and intention

even when we feel alone, birds fly overhead

trees grow in the space between leaf and limb.

There is a lift in in the fabric we are part of, the spaces inside the weave full of hope and faith, intelligence, need and ambition, kindness. We take refuge. We keep each other warm. I am in this. You are in this. We stand not part of it, but within it. All around us, this great, leaping, deeping happening is our refuge.

If we were to take a moment and think about what we value, what’s important, here are some dates to consider for this month:

  • March 3rd – World Wildlife Day
  • March 6th – National Oreo Day
  • March 12th – World Sleep Day – why is that on a Friday??? 
  • March 17th – St. Patrick’s Day
  • March 21st – World Poetry Day
  • March 27th – Passover
  • March 27th – NAACP Awards
  • March 28th – Palm Sunday

Five Minutes a Day

The blog for February, 2021 is written by our own Past President, Renée M. Sgroi.

I was in a Zoom meeting the other day with a group of beginning writers, and was asked about providing some advice for those just setting out on a path towards something that could be called capital W, “Writing”.

I think as writers, everyone comes to “Writing” differently. For some, writing is a hobby, or one they have returned to after an absence of many years.

For others, writing is something they have continually done all their lives, but inconsistently so, sporadically, while for others, writing is a necessity, a passion, the source of all inspiration.

While I make no claims to being an expert on living a “writer’s life” (whatever that may be, in any case), being further along the path than some of the participants in the meeting, I offered the following suggestion.

Especially as poets, perhaps one of the most important things we can do for ourselves is to be consistent. That is, to write every day. And yes, right now, that might be an even greater challenge than it was in a pre-pandemic world, for so many reasons.

So what if you only have five minutes to spare? That’s okay! Five minutes a day is five minutes towards a person’s engagement with their own creative practice. The world’s greatest poem may not be written in five minutes, but then, ignoring one’s own creativity won’t produce that poem either.

And that five minutes can be whatever you want it to be. Freewrite, focused writing, journaling, whatever. But the more consistent it is, the easier it will be to write, to flex that part of the brain that loves to write, that can write.

Fortunately, I think poetry lends itself to shorter time frames. Not because poems are shorter than other types of writing, but because the economy of language that a poem relies on, means that those five minutes could be spent on just one line. Think about that for a sec: one day, one line.

So as we head into a February still circumscribed by pandemic restrictions, try it out. Take advantage of a solid five minutes each day. You might be surprised by what you will create!

Photo by Giallo on Pexels.com
%d bloggers like this: